Newly discovered dinosaur with shark-like teeth predated T.Rex by 7 million years

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The original King of the Dinosaurs! Newly discovered predator with shark-like teeth predated T.Rex by 7 million years – and was even more terrifying, study finds

  • Scientists discovered the dinosaur’s fossilised remains in Uzbekistan
  • They estimate it reached 26ft in length, and weighed over a tonne
  • It lived in Asia 90 million years ago – 7 million years before T.Rex emerged 










T.Rex is often referred to as the ‘King of the Dinosaurs’, but new research suggests that an even more fearsome predator ruled the plains of central Asia 90 million years ago. 

Experts from Nagoya University in Japan have discovered the remains of a giant dinosaur in Uzbekistan, which they say was one of the mightiest killers that ever lived. 

The dinosaur, dubbed Ulughbegsaurus uzbekistanensis, reached 26ft in length and weighed over a tonne. 

The terrifying creature also had blade-like teeth measuring up to six inches long – similar to a Great White Shark’s.   

An analysis suggests that Ulughbegsaurus lived at least 90 million years ago – seven million years before T.Rex emerged around 83 million years ago.  

Experts from Nagoya University in Japan have discovered the remains of a giant dinosaur in Uzbekistan, which they say was one of the mightiest killers that ever lived (artist's impression)

Experts from Nagoya University in Japan have discovered the remains of a giant dinosaur in Uzbekistan, which they say was one of the mightiest killers that ever lived (artist’s impression)

Ulughbegsaurus uzbekistanens

Ulughbegsaurus uzbekistanensis reached 26ft in length and weighed over a tonne. 

The creature also had blade-like teeth measuring up to six inches long – similar to a Great White Shark’s.

Ulughbegsaurus was identified by its left jaw bone and teeth entombed in rocks at a donosaur graveyard known as the Bissekty Formation. 

The frightening animal inhabited a coastal plain at the westernmost point of the Asian landmass when Earth’s continents were still bunched close.

Dr Kohei Tanaka, who led the study, said: ‘Ulughbegsaurus was 8 metres (26ft) in length and over a ton in weight, based on the size of the jaw bone.

‘The skull would have measured about a metre (3ft 3inches). It had knife-like sharp teeth – and was a meat-eater.’

It belonged to a group known as Carcharodontosaurs, or ‘shark-toothed dinosaurs’.

Dr Tanaka added: ‘It closely resembled Neovenator – which was actually discovered in the UK.’

The fossilised bones of Neovenator, meaning ‘new hunter’, were discovered on the Isle of Wight – nicknamed Dinosaur Island.

Ulughbegsaurus was identified by its left jaw bone and teeth entombed in rocks at a donosaur graveyard known as the Bissekty Formation.

It crops out in the Kyzylkum desert and has yielded a vast number of exquisitely preserved prehistoric vertebrates.

The frightening animal inhabited a coastal plain at the westernmost point of the Asian landmass when Earth’s continents were still bunched close.

Dr Tanaka said: ‘Diverse groups including plant eating duck-billed and horned dinosaurs, ankylosaurs and enormous sauropods – and various small carnivore dinosaurs – have been collected there.

‘Ulughbegsaurus, as the apex predator of the ecosystem, hunted these dinosaurs.

‘The Bissekty Formation also includes other animals such as various birds, pterosaurs and mammals. It must have been a fabulously rich environment.’

Carcharodontosaurs are even known to have fought each other – sometimes to the death.

Ulughbegsaurus was identified by its left jaw bone and teeth entombed in rocks at a donosaur graveyard known as the Bissekty Formation

Ulughbegsaurus was identified by its left jaw bone and teeth entombed in rocks at a donosaur graveyard known as the Bissekty Formation

An analysis of the dinosaur's jaw suggests it had blade-like teeth measuring up to six inches long - similar to a Great White Shark's

An analysis of the dinosaur’s jaw suggests it had blade-like teeth measuring up to six inches long – similar to a Great White Shark’s

Face and head bites – including tooth punctures and gouges – have been found in the fossil record.

They were almost certainly inflicted during territorial battles, in the same way animals claim rights today. 

Dr Tanaka added: ‘Ulughbegsaurus represents a previously unknown apex predator – and the first reported carcharodontosaur from Late Cretaceous Central Asia.

‘The discovery also provides evidence predatory carcharodontosaurs and tyrannosaurs co-existed in the region at that time.

‘The former were the dominant predators over smaller tyrannosaurs which became larger later in the Cretaceous – and included T Rex.’

Ulughbegsaurus, described in Royal Society Open Science, sheds light on a peculiar time in history when the world was warm and wet, and covered in shallow seas.

It may have evolved becuase the oceans divided up the land and led to different groups of dinosaurs in different places.

The phenomenon has implications for global warming today as it shows how life may reacts to changes in temperatures, and sea levels. 

KILLING OFF THE DINOSAURS: HOW A CITY-SIZED ASTEROID WIPED OUT 75 PER CENT OF ALL ANIMAL AND PLANT SPECIES

Around 66 million years ago non-avian dinosaurs were wiped out and more than half the world’s species were obliterated.

This mass extinction paved the way for the rise of mammals and the appearance of humans.

The Chicxulub asteroid is often cited as a potential cause of the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event.

The asteroid slammed into a shallow sea in what is now the Gulf of Mexico.

The collision released a huge dust and soot cloud that triggered global climate change, wiping out 75 per cent of all animal and plant species.

Researchers claim that the soot necessary for such a global catastrophe could only have come from a direct impact on rocks in shallow water around Mexico, which are especially rich in hydrocarbons.

Within 10 hours of the impact, a massive tsunami waved ripped through the Gulf coast, experts believe.

Around 66 million years ago non-avian dinosaurs were wiped out and more than half the world's species were obliterated. The Chicxulub asteroid is often cited as a potential cause of the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event (stock image)

Around 66 million years ago non-avian dinosaurs were wiped out and more than half the world’s species were obliterated. The Chicxulub asteroid is often cited as a potential cause of the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event (stock image)

This caused earthquakes and landslides in areas as far as Argentina. 

While investigating the event researchers found small particles of rock and other debris that was shot into the air when the asteroid crashed.

Called spherules, these small particles covered the planet with a thick layer of soot.

Experts explain that losing the light from the sun caused a complete collapse in the aquatic system.

This is because the phytoplankton base of almost all aquatic food chains would have been eliminated.

It’s believed that the more than 180 million years of evolution that brought the world to the Cretaceous point was destroyed in less than the lifetime of a Tyrannosaurus rex, which is about 20 to 30 years.

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